Tapestries: An Exploration of World Maps

Reprinted from an article directory. I couldn’t resist posting information about maps in history.

Article by: Angela Dawson-Field

People have always been curious about the world around them and the development of maps has echoed this historical fascination. Maps were once considered to be valuable objects and were treasured by their owners and regarded as works of art in their own right. These objects attracted the attention of artists as well as skilled draughtsmen and maps became quite ornate and decorative items, capturing the imagination of those who wondered what lay beyond the horizon.

Early maps tended to reflect what people knew or remembered and were largely topographical in nature. Often, these early pieces depicted myth and lore, combining to create “living maps” that were passed form generation to generation. Formalising the topography into early maps, knowledge became standardised and sowed the foundation of early cartography.

By the Middle Ages cartography had slowed in that accuracy became replaced by religious depiction through maps. Examples of strong belief can be seen in some maps where the Holy Land is shown to be at the centre of the earth. Another example is Europa Regina by Johannes Bucius which shows an early and elongated map, depicting Europe as the Queen of the World.

The Age of Seafaring during the 16th and 17th centuries saw new interest in map making, particularly the British and the Dutch taking to the seas and exploring new lands. At this time maps became increasingly artistic. An East Indies map in tropical colouring with pineapple trees and other exotic flora and fauna, designed to capture the imagination and evoke the scent of spice in the air is a typical example. As the demand for cartographers grew in the 17th century the artistic nature of maps from a purely functional item to a work of art began to evolve.

Maps were often decorated elaborately with sea creatures or mythical characters. Many of these very accomplished draughtsmen created quite unique works of art from map making. Maps designed by Petrus Plancius (1552-1622) or Abraham Ortelius (1528-1598) were frequently found embellished with intricate pictorial content. A successor to Abraham Ortelius was the Dutch cartographer Jan Baptist Vrients (1552-1612) who designed Obis Terrae Compendosia. The world is split into two hemispheres and surrounded by ornate and detailed pictorial decoration. The map brings a perception of how the world looks and a plethora of exotic creatures and landscapes from the far flung shores of the globe.

Another famous example is Nova Totius Terrarum, designed by Henricus Hondius (1597-1622), a Dutch Cartographer. This 17th century map is an ornate depiction of the world and is surrounded by detailed nautical scenes, perhaps reflecting the age and drama of exploration by sea as mythical creatures rise from the ocean and men are seen contemplating their journey.

Antique maps are increasingly popular in the modern home and make elaborate tapestries in home décor. There are a number of ways in which an antique map can add charm and elegance to the home, whether in poster, print or tapestry format and are much appreciated by connoisseurs of good taste.

Copyright © The Tapestry House, all rights reserved.

About the Author: Angela Dawson-Field writes extensively on home
decor and tapestry & textile art. The Tapestry House
http://www.thetapestryhouse.com/products/index.html
http://www.thetapestryhouse.com/

Source: Reprint this free article (318215) by Angela Dawson-Field at Isnare.com Free Articles Directory

Barrie Arena Front

Photo-sharing community. Discover the world through photos.

Source: Panoramio – Photo of Barrie Arena Front

I don’t remember the Barrie Arena. We moved to Barrie about the time it was demolished. I came across this photo today and wanted to repost it. I will see what else I can find but likely there isn’t much left to see from the point of urban exploration.

Underwater Ruins, Japan

One of the most hotly debated underwater discoveries dates back to 1995 and is still producing differing theories today. A wayward diver stumbled across the ancient ruin site off the southern coast of Yonaguni, Japan. The site appeared to show huge stone blocks cut into the shape of stairs, paved streets and crossroads. The discovery is estimated to be around 10,000 years old, with many scientists believing it to be the remains of an ancient sunken city. Not everyone agrees though and some experts believe the large blocks are naturally formed and the result of tectonic movement. Whatever the answer may be, it is undoubtedly one of the greatest underwater wonders of the world.

Source: 3. Underwater Ruins. Japan | 20 Underwater Wonders of Our Blue Planet | EarthTripper| Page 1

Interview with Canadian Explorers in Toronto

Two men arrested for late night foray into sewers

Two men arrested for a taking a stroll in the sewers on Sunday shine a light on the world of urban exploration.

interview3interview2interview1Source: Two men arrested for late night foray into sewers | Toronto Star  – By: Katie Daubs and Dale Anne Freed Staff Reporters, Published on Wed Apr 07 2010.

Extinct Animals All Alive Again and No Place to Go

Tasmanian Tiger

Extinct Animals You Might See Alive Someday Soon.

I really enjoyed this article. It was fantasy, creative and practical minded. What do you think about the idea of bringing back dinosaurs and extinct animals? Beyond that, what do you think about keeping animals in zoos, breeding them so they can be kept in captivity and be viewed by school children just for the sake of being able to say “here is another species mankind hasn’t killed off yet”!

Nice to read from the point of view of a writer who can see things realistically rather than going on about how much they love animals. I don’t think anyone is a real animal lover if they can’t see beyond the cute and cuddly.

The point about what to do with these animals once they are brought back is exactly what I was thinking as I read along. The habitat for the animals still here is shrinking all the time. The animals surviving best are the scavengers because they will adapt, fit in where they can and eat just about anything. What is the point in bringing more animals into the world when humans can’t make space for the animals now.

Also, the whole thing about keeping near extinct species in zoos and breeding them (with so much human intervention that we would be calling rape if they were people). The babies are taken from their Mothers and the Mothers are upset and so disturbed they become unable to look after the babies. Then the zookeepers take over claiming the Mother was unfit all along. It is ironic that people take over for nature and then say it isn’t our fault or we need the space because we are the caretakers of our world after all.

(Maybe I’ve just been reading too much Les Miserables today).

Where the Wild Things Are: A Pagan Celebration

Originally posted to ‘BackWash: Where the Wild Things Are’ newsletter, September, 22, 2003.

Tomorrow is the Autumn Equinox. I should be doing something, celebrating the changing seasons. But I’m not. I’ll be at work from 9:00am till 8:30 at night. By the time I’m done I will be too tired to drive myself home. But, I have to do that so I’ll manage somehow. Times like that I’m so glad it’s the car that does all the work!

Anyway, real life does interfere with how Wiccan or Pagan we would like to be. That’s ok, it’s reality. If I was to skip work and the big meeting after work, that would be living in some unreal imaginary world of my own creation. I have to work to make money to pay for my car, my rent and the clothes I wear while I do all those other things. Now and then I even treat myself to a new book, a fancy coffee or a day of window shopping.

It’s ok to live in the real world. It’s ok to miss a Pagan celebration. It would be nicer to not miss it. But, really as long as I’m alive and still on this planet I’m not missing a thing. As I drive I’ll be looking at the darkened forest I drive through on the way home. I’ll be watching for deer and foxes who sometimes show up along the roadside in the evenings. I’ll be listening to the sounds of the night as I drive with the windows down to let in all that cool night air and the scent of crisp Autumn leaves.

You may not light candles, perform rituals or chant pretty rhymes but that doesn’t mean you’re not celebrating along with the rest of the world. It’s what you have in your heart, mind and soul that matters, even if you only express it to yourself. You don’t have to prove how Pagan you are to anyone but you.

Where the Wild Things Are: Karma, Goodness and Light

Originally posted to ‘BackWash: Where the Wild Things Are’ newsletter, August, 12, 2003.

Witches don’t believe in hell, or devils or satan, none of that Christian stuff of nightmares. (Note: I’m sure there is someone who is thinking even now… “that’s not true, I believe in devils, imps and the like”. In my opinion, that’s your choice but most Witches wouldn’t agree).

Anyway, if Witches don’t believe in Christian baddies, is there anything evil that we do belive in? Or is everything all light and good and pure with the world?

No, we do believe there are consequences to your actions and choices. There is the three fold law, there is karma and there is the Wiccan Rede. But, that doesn’t really answer the question, does it?

I do believe there are bad things out there. I don’t trust that everything around us is goodness and light. But, I tend to seldom think about anything negative in that way. It’s not a focus in my day to day doings. If you don’t dwell on evil (whatever word you would call it) it won’t notice you either.

To me even talking about evil sounds a bit looney toon. In the end, people make choices and that is what brings consequences to themselves and the rest of the planet/ people. The evil comes from ourselves, not so much from an outside source. Yes, I think there is an outside source but it’s only as strong as we ourselves make it.

Each day is a new day and you have to choose who you will be, what you will believe in and what you will do.