Ghost Hunters Burn Historic Mansion

The fire at LeBeau broke out at about 2 a.m. local time Friday, Nov. 21, and the building was almost completely destroyed by the time firefighters arrived. The ghost hunters had been trying to produce a reaction from the spirits they assumed resided there, by doing what TV ghost hunters call “provocation,” essentially making loud noises, yelling taunts at the ghosts and banging on walls. Frustrated that their efforts failed to yield any spirits, the group decided to light a fire. Whether this was intended to smoke the spirits out or simply burn the place down, the resulting flames soon reduced the mansion to ashes and four brick chimneys.While many ghost hunters engage in harmless (and fruitless) fun, as this case shows, there can be a dark, dangerous side to the pursuit. In the wake of popular ghost-hunting TV shows, police across the country have seen a surge in people being arrested, injured and even killed while looking for ghosts.

Source: Ghost Hunters Burn Historic Mansion

plantation

Painting of Lebeau Plantation by Elaine Hodges.

From Wikipedia: LeBeau Plantation

The LeBeau Plantation existed in Arabi, Louisiana. It was built as a private residence by Francois LeBeau in 1854. Francois Barthelemy LeBeau bought the land in 1851 and the demolished the house that was already on the property. Though LeBeau died the year that the plantation home was complete, his widow Sylvanie Fuselier lived in the home until her death in 1879.

Between the 1920s and the 1940s, the LeBeau Plantation was known as the Cardone Hotel.

Examiner: Haunted Lebeau Mansion burned by careless ghost hunters

Nobody had lived in the mansion since the 1980’s and there were no injuries. A piece of history was lost in the Arabi, Louisiana. All that is left behind are the four tall chimneys and a pile of charred lumber.

A mansion that stood strong for over 160 years and even survived hurricane Katrina could not fight off the fire that took her to the ground by the carelessness of these seven men.

Blogging 101: Introduce Yourself

Green Living History is something I invented when I wanted to pin myself down. I have a lot of interests and it does seem at some point they all relate to each other. Green Living History is that point. This started out as an ordered list but became a mess. Several of these are interests which fit into my other sites.

  • Solitary Atheist Green Earth Witch – Pagan
  • Vintage Fantasy and Science Fiction
  • Futurism and Retro Futurism
  • Apocalyptic Fiction and Non-Fiction
  • Words and Writing Style
  • Obsolete Technology
  • Tea Sets
  • Coffee (Latte art)
  • Home Office Ideas
  • Dragons
  • Sharks
  • Garden Gnomes
  • Science Fiction and Fantasy Culture
  • Gargoyles and Grotesques
  • Green Living
  • Books (Print Books)
  • Healthy Living and Being BBW
  • Road Trips, Travel and Transportation
  • Tiny Houses and Minimal Living
  • Tiny People as an Art Form
  • Vintage and Old Buildings
  • Print Publishing
  • Ghost Signs
  • Old Cemeteries
  • Ancient and Prehistory
  • Canadian History
  • Women in History
  • Women’s Issues and Feminism
  • Paranormal, the Unexplained, the Supernatural and Mysterious Things
  • Streaming Internet TV
  • WordPress
  • Linux and other Alternative Operating Systems
  • Pixel Art
  • Digital Photography
  • Arts and Crafts and Odd Art Forms
  • Dolls and Doll Making
  • Paper and Ephemera Art
  • Rocks in General and as Art
  • Home and Garden Style
  • Fashion and Costumes
  • Sculpture and Carving
  • Drawing and Illustration
  • Holidays Celebrations and Events
  • ASCII Art
  • Urban and Rural Exploration
  • Creative Writing and Publishing
  • Web Writing and Publishing

 

Read more about me and my other blogs.

The Grass On the Other Side was Greener

Being Green (reprinted from Facebook)

Checking out at the store, the young cashier suggested to the older woman, that she should bring her own grocery bags because plastic bags weren’t good for the environment.

The woman apologized and explained, “We didn’t have this green thing back in my earlier days.”

The young clerk responded, “That’s our problem today. Your generation did not care enough to save our environment f or
future generations.”

She was right — our generation didn’t have the green thing in its day.

Back then, we returned milk bottles, soda bottles and beer bottles to the store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed and sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles over and over. So they really were truly recycled.
But we didn’t have the green thing back in our day.

Grocery stores bagged our groceries in brown paper bags, that we reused for numerous things, most memorable besides household garbage bags, was the use of brown paper bags as book covers for our schoolbooks. This was to ensure that public property, (the books provided for our use by the school) was not defaced by our scribblings. Then we were able to personalize our books on the brown paper bags.

But too bad we didn’t do the green thing back then.

We walked up stairs, because we didn’t have an escalator in every store and office building. We walked to the grocery store and didn’t climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to go two blocks.

But she was right. We didn’t have the green thing in our day.

Back then, we washed the baby’s diapers because we didn’t have the throwaway kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy-gobbling machine burning up 220 volts — wind and solar power really did dry our clothes back in our early days. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing.

But that young lady is right; we didn’t have the green thing back in our day.

Back then, we had one TV, or radio, in the house — not a TV in every room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief (remember them?), not a screen the size of the state of Montana. In the kitchen, we blended and stirred by hand because we didn’t have electric machines to do everything for us. When we packaged a fragile item to send in the mail, we used wadded up old newspapers to cushion it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap. Back then, we didn’t fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power. We exercised by working so we didn’t need to go to a health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity.

But she’s right; we didn’t have the green thing back then.

We drank from a fountain when we were thirsty instead of using a cup or a plastic bottle every time we had a drink of water. We refilled writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and we replaced the razor blades in a razor instead of throwing away the whole razor just because the blade got dull.

But we didn’t have the green thing back then.

Back then, people took the streetcar or a bus and kids rode their bikes to school or walked instead of turning their moms into a 24-hour taxi service. We had one electrical outlet in a room, not an entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn’t need a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 23,000 miles out in space in order to find the nearest burger joint.

But isn’t it sad the current generation laments how wasteful we old folks were just because we didn’t have the green thing back then?

Please forward this on to another selfish old person who needs a lesson in conservation from a smart ass young person.

Would you Be a Great Junk or Antiques Picker?

If you were picking for antiques and such I think you would need to go beyond looking in established places like flea markets and auctions. Even the American Pickers approach people who seem to be hoarders/ collectors in their own backyards and see what they can buy from them. To me, that’s what picking would really be.

The Canadian Pickers are advertising a casting call for people with a lot of antiques/ collectibles and junk to sell. Doesn’t that kind of spoil the whole thing? It really loses the entire aspect of mystery, random chance and treasure hunting if you are going after fish in a barrel.

My Mom and I like to look at stuff in the thrift stores. I don’t consider anything we buy at the store to be picking. Picking is finding something thrown out or going up to ask someone if they would sell their junk to you. Picking is DIY (do it yourself) not shopping.

We do pick up stuff we find tossed out at the end of people’s driveways or in rubbish bins, dumpsters, and so on. Some of it gets refurbished and given to family members, mostly furniture which we fix up.

Also, I’m amazed at how much junk people collect from TV shows, movies, etc. I don’t see much of that being worth anything in the long run. Just like the Beanie Baby craze. You can’t do much with any of those stuffed animals now except dust them. (I’d throw them in the washer to make a quick job of it… but that might detract from their value as a great collectible. NOT!).

I think the best advice for anyone picking up antiques, junk or collectibles is to think about the future and think along the lines of what will be practical in the future (and in the present). Don’t get carried away collecting something you couldn’t even find a decent way to recycle. Beanie Babies may be cute in the eye of the beholder (years ago) but they’re just a lot of small stuffed animals now. No real purpose to them now. There are far too many of them for them to ever have a chance to pick up in value again. I’m always seeing them sold in thrift stores for less than a dollar.

What is it Worth?

People most often post to the antique and picker forums to ask about the worth of stuff. It’s interesting to read about all the objects/ stuff they post about. But, the worth of something is always whatever you can get someone else to pay for it. Really, that is the long and short of it.

No one can really tell you what something is worth unless they are pulling out their purse or wallet and offering to pay you the amount they say the object is worth. Anything less is just speculation. You could find someone who would pay more than the guess amount from any expert. Or, you might not find anyone who values your stuff as well as you do. In that case it might have nothing but sentimental value – until you find someone who feels the same sentimental value as yourself.

How to Become a History Buff

Peace, Love MuseumsI think our interest in history begins with our own family. Parents and Grandparents talk about their own past, their parents and even farther back in your own history if you are lucky.

The first thing I ever did myself was to record my Grandmother’s sister, Alice, talking about her life, her past and what she remembered from when she was a girl living in Ireland. In school we made family trees, but that wasn’t something I had done on my own initiative. I still have the tape recording, I just don’t have a machine I can hear it on. Technology isn’t always our best friend.

Many people get into genealogy and stop there when it comes to history. Not me. I have researched many people (mostly women adventurers and fighters of one kind or another) and places (mainly local history, places I have found through my own exploring). I also like to research the history of paranormal things and creatures like dragons. (Can you prove they don’t exist?)

Try the history buff quiz for fun.

How to Learn About History on Your Own

Narrow your focus.

Choose a time period, an event, a country, a building, a person or some other smaller area of history you want to learn more about. Narrow your focus a bit because history is huge as a topic. Every moment becomes history as we live it.

Start a journal.

Pick a notebook (or bring a laptop) to take notes, write down facts and information as you find them. Keep notes about the resources you have used too. You may want to use the same book, website, etc. again or find the author of the book for more information, even an interview.

Keep a pen and pencils handy. Along with the journal you might want to draw maps, sketch a face, or use colour pencil crayons to organize your notes. Consider a hand scanner which you can take to scan a document or pages in a book rather than giving yourself writer’s cramp.

Review your notes and pull things together in a report.

It isn’t enough to have a rambling collection of facts. When you put all your information together to create a report (just for yourself even) it really helps you see everything as a bigger picture. You also notice details which you hadn’t seen connected before.

Join a local history society or group.

It’s okay to go it alone when you can’t find anyone to share your interest. But, most towns will have a local museum and a local history society too. Of course cities may have more resources for you once you begin looking. If the person or place you are researching is something local then the historical society will likely invite you to present your research to the group at a meeting. (Of course, this is up to you to do or turn down if you just can’t handle public speaking).

yesterday is history

Where to Learn About History on Your Own

  • Visit museums and libraries and talk to the staff there. Let them know about your interest in history – they usually have suggestions you wouldn’t have thought of.
  • Get on the mailing list so you will know when a new exhibit comes to your local museum or library.
  • Visit the art gallery and look at paintings/ illustrations from the time period you are looking at.
  • Make the trek to bigger cities and visit those museums and libraries too.
  • Look at genealogy. It’s a lot of information but a nice way to track down ancestors and find out where the bodies are buried, literally.
  • Get online and track down other people who share your interest. Read their websites or weblogs. Leave comments or notes for them. Ask questions. If they really seem to know a lot ask if you can send them some questions, even interview them through email.
  • If your interest is something local, get out there with your camera. Take photos of the places where history happened. Talk to people like urban explorers or look them up online and see the photos they have taken too.
  • If your interest is Medieval history talk to people who like Renaissance Fairs and create their own costumes to wear based on the authentic clothing worn in the time period.
  • If you have an interest in prehistory, find out about anyone who has been digging up history in the area you are researching. Try to find them online and get information from the source.
  • Read fictional history books too. In most cases the authors will talk about their research and any liberties they took in changing history for their fiction. Meanwhile, you will be reading an account based on all their own research of the time period, the place or person you are researching too.
  • Keep an eye on the news, online and through the television and radio too. History happens all the time. New finds and discoveries come up in the news more often than you may think.
  • Talk to people who were there for history in this century. Read biographies from people in earlier times. You may even find autobiographies which they wrote themselves versus a biography which was written about them.
  • Watch for TV programs, documentaries, coming up for your history interest. Talk to your librarian and see if any documentary can be ordered in for you. Talk to the people who were interviewed in the documentary and, of course, the people who created the documentary would be a great source of information. (The narrator is not always a great source, look for the people who produced the documentary).

Where to Find History Online

On This Day in History…

Nothing too Good for a Cowboy on TV

I couldn’t find “Nothing too Good for a Cowboy” on TV after seeing it by chance more than a month ago. Tonight, after a blow up with my sister that has left me with a headache and other things, I found it again. Just as I was going to lose myself in a hot shower. So I missed a lot of the show in the beginning and then during the shower. But, it didn’t really matter. It’s just so nice to see it and I already know the general plot after reading one of the books the show is based on. Anyway, now I looked it up and know when it is on. Just have to remember it for next week.

Richmond Pearson Hobson, Jr. (November 27, 1907 – August 9, 1966) was an American-Canadian author who wrote memoirs of his life as a rancher in British Columbia. His books, Grass Beyond the Mountains, Nothing Too Good for a Cowboy, and The Rancher Takes a Wife, inspired a CBC television program (Nothing Too Good for a Cowboy).

Queen Street and Carlaw



Took these today at the Queen Street East and Carlaw intersection. The smaller building was once the offices for Playing with Time, the people who created the Degrassi TV show. Last thing seemed to be a Youth Hostel Training Centre. Now it’s for sale, or was. Looked like the sign was different today. I would have taken more photos but the camera battery was unhappy and kept shutting me down.

Canadian Ghost Towns


Ghost Town Pix

The Lost Villages Historical Society

Abandoned Houses in Ontario – The Heritage Photography Project

Forgotten Ontario – a TV show.

Ghost Towns Canada

There are also grain elevators which are kind of their own vertical ghost town.

The photo here came from Bankhead Ghost Town, Alberta, Canada. I don’t know who took the photo but I would really like to see more.