Old Barrie Buildings in Vintage Postcards

I like the vintage postcards even better than the photographs. I collected postcards for years and the older cards were always my favourites, when I could find one. Likely that postcard collecting has stayed with me.

Some of these buildings (if not all) are demolished. The waterfront image helps to show where they were.

Why do I Like Abandoned Places?

abandonedplaces

via – Quora.

How would you answer the question, for yourself or for others? It’s not so easy to pinpoint why I like abandoned places. I think this is the best I have done at trying to come up with a concrete answer that makes sense and isn’t too much on the flowery side.

Something between proving we have a history, the endurance of what we have created and the mystery and sadness of what has been left behind.

(Reposted from the screen capture because sometimes software mangles image files).

Paddlewheel Ruins in Manitoba

I hope explorers in the area have gotten out there to photograph them before they are demolished, too far gone, vandalized or repurposed and sold as scrap.

The Paddlewheel Queen once adorned every tourist brochure promoting Winnipeg and half the postcards — the other half featured the Golden Boy.The sternwheeler with the spinning paddle blades in back — rollin’, rollin’, rollin’ on the river — was the iconic image of Winnipeg.

Source: Paddlewheel Queens: Passenger ships once ruled the Red River – Winnipeg Free Press

Cityscapes on Rings

I really like the idea of these but I really can’t afford to buy one. Besides, I’m Canadian. I could come up with my own design and turn it into an ASCII art image. It’s something I would like to do but haven’t started yet.

If you happen to be from one of these cities you may want to get a ring. Most locations were the US and Europe.

ringscitiesSource: View City by Shekhtwoman on Etsy

What is an Archivist?

I’ve been interested in keeping old content and what happens to content once the source is gone, for a long time. In particular, web content, since the days I was an editor with the Open Directory Project. I liked finding sites which disappeared. Often I could find them again, on their own domain or from their own domain to a free service like Blogger. I liked tracking them down. It was an adventure and something I could feel pleased about. Not every site could be found again. Often, they were abandoned too. Content still there but no one maintaining it.

There are so many other issues when it comes to preserving online/ web content. Consider the web host the site is on. When payments to the host stop it isn’t long before the domain expires and the site will go missing. What happens to your own sites, social media and whatever else you’ve got, if you die? I think about that too. Mine would all just be gone and not all that missed. But, I’ve written it mostly for myself and my own satisfaction, something new to learn.

I’ve got archives of ASCII art. Loads of it but all a mess, not organized. I try to sort it but soon decide my methods are not working well and no one will actually find anything. Plus, there is the problem of how to display it. ASCII art works in plain text files but does not show up on an HTML site (very well or easily) that way. I’ve had people bitch, complaining that it isn’t really ASCII art if it’s shown in an image file versus plain text. Well, whine on, but you don’t have the headache of trying to make it work.

Anyway, so much for keeping on point…

 

I’d like to know more about how web content is being archived and what people are doing with the content they save. How is it being stored? Is it viewable by anyone? What about copyrights? So many questions… what is an archivist

via- The Association of Canadian Archivists

Found a Local Ghost Sign

I was looking at Google Maps today and noticed a ghost sign I haven’t noticed before. I’ve actually walked along those streets, on the corner of Dunlop right there but it didn’t catch my eye. Next time I’m out downtown I will have to get a photograph of this sign myself. This image is a screen capture from Google Maps.

ghost sign dunlop

The Wonderful Camera Obscura

The Wonderful Camera Obscura.

The camera obscura – Latin for “dark room” – was a sort of giant camera that Victorians could enjoy along with the other delights of the seaside, for they were usually found on popular beaches or in parks – anywhere that tourists and passers-by could enjoy them.

Briefly, the camera obscura works on the optical principle that when a pinhole of light is admitted to a dark room, the rays of light order themselves into an upside-down image of what is outside. The camera obscuras of the Victoria era were fitted with a lens (to sharpen the image that was created by the thin ray of light) and with a mirror to cast the image onto a horizontal viewing surface.