Old Mill in Caledonia

Say farewell to the old Caledonia mill, which has sat on the banks of the Grand River since 1853.

Efforts to restore the last water-powered mill on the Grand River began in 1981 but have consistently been curbed, mainly because of the funding issues.

The Golden Horseshoe Antique Society, which ran the town’s annual steam show, took on the project in 1981 when the Grand River Conservation Authority threatened to tear the mill down. The latter acquired the property in 1979 with the idea of turning the site into a park.

The mill stopped grinding flour and feed in 1966. In the 19th Century, it put out more than one thousand 300-pound barrels of flour a week and shipped to Europe, Quebec and Western Canada. It operated as a feed store until 1975.

Source for the above photos and text: The wheel has finally turned for the old Caledonia mill | TheSpec.com

Too late to get any photos myself. This was due to be demolished and replaced by March of this year (according to the article). Not so many old mills left in Ontario.

Killing Art for Politics

Demolishing art (and architecture) bothers me. The history does not go away, but the art does. Losing art and architecture due to changing politics is not a good thing.

How will people in the future understand the past if it is all whitewashed?

In a letter to the Mayoral Advisory Commission on City Art, Monuments, and Markers, the signatories advocate for the removal of monuments to Christopher Columbus, J. Marion Sims, and Teddy Roosevelt.

Source: Over 120 Prominent Artists and Scholars Call on NYC to Take Down Racist Monuments

Old Barrie Buildings in Vintage Postcards

I like the vintage postcards even better than the photographs. I collected postcards for years and the older cards were always my favourites, when I could find one. Likely that postcard collecting has stayed with me.

Some of these buildings (if not all) are demolished. The waterfront image helps to show where they were.

The House is Long Gone

This was the first house I photographed with a digital camera.  Both the house and the camera are gone now. I bought a new camera, but the house was irreplaceable. To me the old houses become stoic individuals, one of a kind, the longer they remain abandoned. Please don’t vandalize, salvage, or take souvenirs. (I partially exempt garden plants because they are living things which can bloom again).

Postcard of a Demolished School

If you’re in Toronto you could find out the original address on Broadview and see what is built there now. If you aren’t in Toronto try Google Street View. Looks like it was replaced by a new school. It`s back in the trees on Street View so I`m not 100% sure.
etsy.com

The imposing and grand architecture of the Queen Alexandria School on Broadview Avenue in Toronto is now gone from the landscape yet it is captured here on this vintage postcard for future generations. I believe the school was built around 1905 and demolished in the mid 1950s.

via – Queen Alexandria School Broadview Avenue TORONTO by TheOldBarnDoor

Broadview Street School jpg

The real challenge would be to see what (if anything) is left of the white house to the right in this colour postcard I found online.

Paddlewheel Ruins in Manitoba

I hope explorers in the area have gotten out there to photograph them before they are demolished, too far gone, vandalized or repurposed and sold as scrap.

The Paddlewheel Queen once adorned every tourist brochure promoting Winnipeg and half the postcards — the other half featured the Golden Boy.The sternwheeler with the spinning paddle blades in back — rollin’, rollin’, rollin’ on the river — was the iconic image of Winnipeg.

Source: Paddlewheel Queens: Passenger ships once ruled the Red River – Winnipeg Free Press

Barrie Arena Front

Photo-sharing community. Discover the world through photos.

Source: Panoramio – Photo of Barrie Arena Front

I don’t remember the Barrie Arena. We moved to Barrie about the time it was demolished. I came across this photo today and wanted to repost it. I will see what else I can find but likely there isn’t much left to see from the point of urban exploration.

House Along the Highway (2006)

These photos are from two different trips to see this house. The first time I could not cross the field, past the barn. So my photos were taken from far back. But I did get a few photos of the crumbled shed and the actual house peeking around the barn.

Later I went back and walked to the house. It had a wonderful front door. Odd, but there were doors on three sides of the house. Inside was a lot of storage, turned to junk from animals, weather, etc.

This house went down sometime early this year, 2015, or possibly late in 2014. A Car in the Field 277822619 Broken Panes 294964647 Farmhouse by Highway 400 277822603 Farmhouse in the Distance 277822517 Farmhouse near Cookstown 277822536

Porch at the Back 294965663 Shed on the Farm 277822688 Side view 294964007 The Backside 294964361 The Doorless Side 294963702 The Fancy Front Door 294965036 The Front 294965410 The Old Farmhouse off Hwy 400 277822495 Through the Window 294965976 Tumbled Shed 277822576 Wrecked Shed 277822646

The House with a Face (2006)

I still think of this house as the one with the best face (it looked like a face to me).

I think this is the second house I explored, but not on my own. I’ve taken three different people/ groups to visit here. The last time (with the group) the house was demolished. That was sad.

This was also from 2006. I will add more photos from the other visits I made over the years while the house stood.

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