Address Photography

Edward Donnelly, from California, in the US, posts photographs of address plates from buildings. How often do you pass by these house numbers and not even think twice about them? But, some are unique, old and interesting.

Address Photography

Do you have a house number visible on your home? Numbers should be easy to read, big in size, and a contrasting colour to the background they are affixed to. Placing house numbers on your mail box isn’t enough. These days not everyone has a mailbox and they tend to be smaller numbers, not so easy to read from the street.

I have large house numbers over the garage and another set at the front door of the house. No credit to me, the numbers where here when we bought the house. One of those little things people usually don’t think of when they move into a new house. But, a nice thing to give your home some extra character and a practical item too.

House numbers on Etsy, shop VEVA Designs Co.

SmartSign has more tips about house numbers.
Using clear house numbers is important! It makes life easier for your guests, for your postman, and for emergency service workers who might need to find you. The rules for displaying house numbers vary, depending on where you live. However, the following recommendations will ensure that your house number is placed where it can be seen by emergency responders, postal services, courier companies, and so on.

Placement :

  • The house number should be visible from the road or street in front of the property. As such, the house number sign should be placed on the side of the house that faces the road.
  • If the house is too far from the road, the house number should be displayed on the mailbox.
  • There’s a chance that you or someone else may park their vehicle in front of the mailbox; in this case, it’s suitable to paint your house number on your driveway. The number should be painted on the side of the driveway that faces the moving traffic.
  • If your mailbox isn’t in front of your house or near your driveway, post a house number sign in your yard.
  • The house number, whether displayed on the house, mailbox, or curb, should be unobstructed by objects such as tree limbs, bushes, debris, or decorations.
  • A house number sign should be placed in close proximity to the porch light so it can be seen at night. When that isn’t possible, invest in reflective house address signs.

Color :

  • Overglow can be blinding, and makes it difficult for anyone to see your house number.
  • The color of the numbers should be in sharp contrast to their background. Certain colors on reflective address number signs may glow too much under headlights, which can overshadow the number on the sign. This is a major cause of concern for emergency personnel.
  • White numbers on a black background is an ideal combination of colors when displaying the number on the house, mailbox, or curb.
  • Brass or bronze numbers should be avoided – they don’t offer optimum visibility at night.
  • When posting your address number or a sign on the mailbox, don’t use the same colors as the mailbox. Stickers with shiny silver numbers on a black background should be avoided, as well.
  • You can also mount a sign above or below your mailbox.

Design:

  • Use Arabic numerals. Writing numbers in words should be avoided.
  • Most local governments recommend displaying numbers horizontally.
  • While the color of the numbers and the background should contrast with each other, the alignment of the two should be the same. Avoid vertical signs with numbers aligned horizontally (and vice versa).

Size :

  • Always make sure you buy a sign that fits the post. Oversized signs are aesthetically unpleasing, and undersized signs are hard to read.
  • House numbers should be big and bold. According to the the International Building Code each number must be a minimum of 4 inches (102 mm) in height with a minimum stroke width of 0.5 inch (12.7 mm).
  • While the color of the numbers and the background should contrast with each other, the alignment of the two should be the same. Avoid vertical signs with numbers aligned horizontally (and vice versa).

Dump Diggers in Toronto

Just Rob Campbell on the site currently. The original link and photo were from 2008. Rob continues digging, finding and collecting old bottles (in his recent posts) and other Toronto based old treasures.

Dumpdiggers chronicles the adventures of low tech treasure hunters Rob Campbell (that’s me) and Tim Braithwaite as we research and recover antiques from forgotten historical sites.

Found site on Canada Blog Friends.

 

The Stray Shopping Cart Project

strayshoppingcartsJulian Montague – The Stray Shopping Cart Project

Next time you see a shopping cart in the wild, will you document it? I have taken a couple of photos but I don’t think I ever posted them. Shopping carts are a very urban/ suburban thing. Something overlooked and yet they turn up in so many places. I’ve never taken one home myself. Once, I did bring a cart all the way to the end of the parking lot where I caught the bus. Just once… maybe twice. But, I had a lot of groceries that day – they were heavy and I didn’t want to miss the bus.

Take Another Look at Your Local Bus Stop

Most bus stops in North America are fairly standard issue from the bus company. There isn’t a lot of variety and bus stop shelters don’t tend to stay up once the bus route changes. Sadly, they tend to be vandalized too often as well. But, Christopher Herwig found unique bus stop shelters, enough to make a book about them: Soviet Bus Stops.

I like this one because it looks like a spaceship.

Graffiti Art Hearts

Paul Angel, in the UK, has made a project of photographing hearts carved or drawn in public places. A nice project for an urban explorer. Where could you find the oldest graffiti hearts in your local area? Have you ever created one yourself and if so, how did you make it and what did you make it on?
carvedheartA series Paul Angel, UK, has been working on since 2004, photographing graffiti love hearts and pairing them with the spaces in which they are found.

A book based on the Graffiti Hearts project.

Start Looking for Hand Made Lettering

Here’s something you probably haven’t thought to look for, calligraphy or hand made lettering. Not just for the written page but chiseled into stone or carved into wood or painted onto walls. Where else? Visit the blog and see what you may have been missing. (It’s typography when it’s machine made lettering, calligraphy when it’s created by hand).

calligraphySource: Calligraphy as Seen From my Bicycle –  Calligraphy in old churches and other places as seen during cycling tours around Europe. By Wlodek Fenrych. 

Urban Combing

Being a little land-locked, it’s not possible to go beach combing in Long Eaton and urban combing is probably the next best thing. Here are lots of bits and pieces I recovered from my garden whilst digging the mud and also a few odds and ends from my walks with the dog.

Source: Urban Combing #1 – I Am A Magpie – a photo on Flickriver

The lost art of found objects. (It sounds great as a phrase but I don’t think beachcombing (or urban combing) has ever been lost).

Fake Buildings

littlehouseI’ve seen at least a couple of small houses which have never been lived in. They were built to disguise equipment/ machinery for the telephone/ power company. It’s not so hard to recognize them because they all look about the same.

The image in this post comes from Google street view. This house is one I see every time I go to the local grocery store, it’s just a couple of streets away, in my neighbourhood.

Faux facades, fake buildings or whatever official name they have been given are interesting to find.

Have you seen any? You may not have noticed them. You may think your town is too small to have one, or any. It’s not the size of the town, however, it’s the location that counts.

  • power relay stations
  • cell phone infrastructure
  • train tunnels
  • ventilation
  • emergency access

Sources for other fake buildings:

Make Your Own Hinterland Who’s Who Spot

If you are Canadian (not too young) you will remember Hinterland Who’s Who on TV. I think this is a great idea for anyone wanting to make their own programs/ videos.

  • Pick a topic (animals if you want to submit it to Hinterland).
  • Do some research.
  • Make your film/ video.

Now you’ve got your own documentary on video.

The same idea can work for urban, rural or any exploring you do. No need to start with something exotic, look into the history of your own home, an interesting place on your own street, or the local park. Start documenting!

Make Your Own HWW Spot

Materials

  • camcorder or digital camera with video and sound recording (optional)
  • video editing software, such as:
    • MAC: iMovie, Final Cut Pro
    • PC: Windows Movie Maker, Adobe Premiere Elements, Adobe Premiere Pro
  • voice recorder

Background

Most Canadians who had television in the 1960s or 1970s will remember it — the haunting strains of a lone flute, the trademark theme of Hinterland Who’s Who. The series of 60-second vignettes was created to educate the public about this country’s native wildlife through excellent film footage, natural sounds, and relaxed narration.

Now, more than 40 years after the series’ introduction, Environment Canada (EC) and the Canadian Wildlife Federation (CWF) have relaunched Hinterland Who’s Who in an effort to connect another generation of Canadians with their natural heritage. The new public-service announcements carry on the classic theme of the original vignettes but also address the need to conserve and protect native species and their habitat.

Procedure

Here are some simple steps to make your Hinterland Who’s Who production a success:

  1. Decide on a Canadian wildlife species on which to make a video.
  2. Research basic elements about that species, including information such as:
    • appearance
    • where it lives in Canada
    • how to conserve the species

    Information on many Canadian species can be found at hww.ca

  3. If possible, take your own footage of your chosen species using a camcorder or digital recording device, or find available footage online.
  4. If possible take pictures of your chosen species, or find available photos online. Make sure you get permission from the photographer first!
  5. Combining all the above information, write a short (60 second) video script that ties the species information and imagery together.
  6. Record all audio and combine all elements together, including HWW music and logo, in video editing software.
  7. Submit your video to hww.ca, and where appropriate, videos will be posted online.

Source: Hinterland Who’s Who – Make Your Own HWW Spot

Street Furniture

It may not be an official name, but street furniture is a good name for all the items and objects which make up a city street. Do you notice the:

  • street signs
  • street lights
  • traffic barriers
  • traffic lights
  • mail boxes
  • hand rails
  • bus stops
  • phone booths
  • cigarette receptacles
  • fire hydrants
  • garbage cans
  • benches
  • bicycle racks
  • parking meters
  • sidewalks

and so many other small, old and taken for granted parts of the city streets? What can you find in your own area which has been around awhile and gone unnoticed?

The first telephone boxes, a porter’s rest from 1861 or a street lamp powered by sewage – just a few of the things we can walk past every day in London without often noticing them. Have you ever noticed the smallest Listed structures in London, the K2 phone boxes?

secret-london.co.uksecret-london.co.uksecret-london.co.uk

Source: SECRET LONDON / Trivia / Street_Furniture