Abandoned Places to Find in Montreal

Not in Ontario, but, if you take a trip into Quebec it will be nice to have a list of places to see. There must be a great list of places in Quebec City too. Of course, there is the possibility that some of them will be gone before you get there. I found the Restaurant Chez Clo (#10 on the list) is already gone when I looked at the Google Street View link. You can still see it from overhead on Google Earth. But it magically disappears when you go in for a close up to Street View.

demolished

With all of the new construction going up around Montreal, it’s easy to forget about the city’s rich history. But Montreal has a long legacy of fascinating buildings that have been abandoned for various reasons. Here are ten of the coolest ones to check out.

1. Silo No. 5 – Pointe-du-Moulin
2. Brock Street Tunnel – Rue St-Antoine and Rue Beaudry
3. CN Wellington Control Building – Near Rue Smith and Rue Murray
4. Omnipac – 6240 Avenue du Parc
5. Blue Bonnets Raceway – 7440 Boulevard Decarie
6. Jenkins Brothers Steel Co. – Between Avenue Georges V and Ave 1re
7. CN Fruit Warehouse – 500 Rue Bridge
8. Dow Brewery – 990 Rue Notre Dame Ouest
9. The Negro Community Centre/Charles H. Este Cultural Centre – 2035 Rue Coursol
10. Restaurant Chez Clo – 3199 Rue Ontario Est

Source – 10 Abandoned Buildings In Montreal Worth Exploring | MTL Blog.

I took a look at that church/ community centre. Google’s images are from 2012, the post from the MTL Blog was from 2014 so no telling what shape that’s in now, if it’s still there. I noticed something interesting on top of the roof. I thought they were butterflies, but possibly not.

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Nottawasaga Lighthouse

I had this on my mental list of places to see already. It isn’t that far away. Another place to see and photograph before it’s gone.

Nottawasaga Lighthouse one of National Trust for Canada’s Top 10 Endangered Places.

Erected in 1858, the Nottawasaga Lighthouses was one of six Imperial Towers built to light the shores of Lake Huron and Georgian Bay. The whitewashed limestone light rises 95 feet above the shore, guiding ships to safety in Collingwood Harbour. It played an important part in the establishment of safe navigation routes along the coastal waters of Lake Huron following the opening of the Bruce Peninsula.

Deemed unsafe, the lighthouse was decommissioned in 2003 after an engineering study noted that the lighthouse’s exterior masonry, which had been damaged by lightning strikes and subsequent water infiltration, was at risk of collapse. A year later, a portion of the masonry crumbled. Though the Department of Fisheries and Oceans invested $400,000 to stabilize the remaining façade starting in 2005, it has since been abandoned and, without swift action, is unlikely to survive many more winters.

Source: Nottawasaga Lighthouse | The National Trust for Canada

Make Your Own Hinterland Who’s Who Spot

If you are Canadian (not too young) you will remember Hinterland Who’s Who on TV. I think this is a great idea for anyone wanting to make their own programs/ videos.

  • Pick a topic (animals if you want to submit it to Hinterland).
  • Do some research.
  • Make your film/ video.

Now you’ve got your own documentary on video.

The same idea can work for urban, rural or any exploring you do. No need to start with something exotic, look into the history of your own home, an interesting place on your own street, or the local park. Start documenting!

Make Your Own HWW Spot

Materials

  • camcorder or digital camera with video and sound recording (optional)
  • video editing software, such as:
    • MAC: iMovie, Final Cut Pro
    • PC: Windows Movie Maker, Adobe Premiere Elements, Adobe Premiere Pro
  • voice recorder

Background

Most Canadians who had television in the 1960s or 1970s will remember it — the haunting strains of a lone flute, the trademark theme of Hinterland Who’s Who. The series of 60-second vignettes was created to educate the public about this country’s native wildlife through excellent film footage, natural sounds, and relaxed narration.

Now, more than 40 years after the series’ introduction, Environment Canada (EC) and the Canadian Wildlife Federation (CWF) have relaunched Hinterland Who’s Who in an effort to connect another generation of Canadians with their natural heritage. The new public-service announcements carry on the classic theme of the original vignettes but also address the need to conserve and protect native species and their habitat.

Procedure

Here are some simple steps to make your Hinterland Who’s Who production a success:

  1. Decide on a Canadian wildlife species on which to make a video.
  2. Research basic elements about that species, including information such as:
    • appearance
    • where it lives in Canada
    • how to conserve the species

    Information on many Canadian species can be found at hww.ca

  3. If possible, take your own footage of your chosen species using a camcorder or digital recording device, or find available footage online.
  4. If possible take pictures of your chosen species, or find available photos online. Make sure you get permission from the photographer first!
  5. Combining all the above information, write a short (60 second) video script that ties the species information and imagery together.
  6. Record all audio and combine all elements together, including HWW music and logo, in video editing software.
  7. Submit your video to hww.ca, and where appropriate, videos will be posted online.

Source: Hinterland Who’s Who – Make Your Own HWW Spot

Tobermory Shipwrecks

Fathom Five National Marine Park offers some of the best freshwater diving opportunities in Canada. Clear, clean water, submerged geological formations (cliffs, caves, overhangs) and over 20 historic shipwrecks offer a variety of underwater experiences. Everyone, from the novice snorkeller to the most advanced diving enthusiast, can find lots to explore and enjoy within the park.

Source: Tobermory is home to over 20 historic shipwrecks

Doors Open.ca

Doors Open Toronto

Doors Open Ontario

Doors Open Canada

Celebrating our architectural heritage. The aim of Doors Open events is to facilitate people’s understanding and enjoyment of their local architectural environment while encouraging awareness of their built heritage.

TO Live with Culture A guide to Toronto’s culture and arts scene, events.

If you’re in Vancouver, BC, there is Northern Voice

Northern Voice is a two-day, non-profit personal blogging conference that’s being held at the UBC main campus on February 23-24, 2007.