The Falconry Centre in Tottenham

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At some point this contained over 200 birds. But it’s closed (2012) and left to fall apart now. You can see what it was using the Internet Wayback Machine link.

The owner of the property has his own story at The House of Emonts.

Simcoe News – Major drug bust at falconry centre – More of the story.

I haven’t seen the place. It certainly has an interesting back story. How did growing pot (which is being made legal according to Justin Trudeau) bring about so much chaos and loss? It must be quite an interesting place to see. But, I don’t know about accessing the location. Probably smart to ask first.

Graffiti Art Hearts

Paul Angel, in the UK, has made a project of photographing hearts carved or drawn in public places. A nice project for an urban explorer. Where could you find the oldest graffiti hearts in your local area? Have you ever created one yourself and if so, how did you make it and what did you make it on?
carvedheartA series Paul Angel, UK, has been working on since 2004, photographing graffiti love hearts and pairing them with the spaces in which they are found.

A book based on the Graffiti Hearts project.

Rosemary Hasner – Ontario Rural Ruins in Art

These images are based on photographs of Ontario rural locations, some abandoned but some just old and interesting.  Mixed media photography. I like the images with the postal marks on them. A personal thing from all the years I wrote penpal letters and still really like vintage postcards. But, my favourite of all of these is the one with the plain wooden house and all the greenery in the foreground.  I like the look of it, much less spooky than the other images. I think it has a touch of fantasy and is more interesting because it’s less forbidding and doom and gloom.

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Via – Rosemary Hasner at Black Dog Creative Arts.

Why do I Like Abandoned Places?

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via – Quora.

How would you answer the question, for yourself or for others? It’s not so easy to pinpoint why I like abandoned places. I think this is the best I have done at trying to come up with a concrete answer that makes sense and isn’t too much on the flowery side.

Something between proving we have a history, the endurance of what we have created and the mystery and sadness of what has been left behind.

(Reposted from the screen capture because sometimes software mangles image files).

Start Looking for Hand Made Lettering

Here’s something you probably haven’t thought to look for, calligraphy or hand made lettering. Not just for the written page but chiseled into stone or carved into wood or painted onto walls. Where else? Visit the blog and see what you may have been missing. (It’s typography when it’s machine made lettering, calligraphy when it’s created by hand).

calligraphySource: Calligraphy as Seen From my Bicycle –  Calligraphy in old churches and other places as seen during cycling tours around Europe. By Wlodek Fenrych. 

Save Ontario Shipwrecks

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Save Ontario Shipwrecks is a Provincial Heritage Organization in Ontario dedicated to the study, preservation and promotion of an appreciation of Ontario’s marine heritage. Incorporated in 1981, SOS is a public charitable organization of dedicated volunteers from across the Province. Operating mainly through a group of Local Chapter Committees supported by a Provincial Board of Directors and Provincial Executive, our volunteers have undertaken many worthwhile projects and activities.

Source: About | Save Ontario Shipwrecks

Abandoned Places to Find in Montreal

Not in Ontario, but, if you take a trip into Quebec it will be nice to have a list of places to see. There must be a great list of places in Quebec City too. Of course, there is the possibility that some of them will be gone before you get there. I found the Restaurant Chez Clo (#10 on the list) is already gone when I looked at the Google Street View link. You can still see it from overhead on Google Earth. But it magically disappears when you go in for a close up to Street View.

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With all of the new construction going up around Montreal, it’s easy to forget about the city’s rich history. But Montreal has a long legacy of fascinating buildings that have been abandoned for various reasons. Here are ten of the coolest ones to check out.

1. Silo No. 5 – Pointe-du-Moulin
2. Brock Street Tunnel – Rue St-Antoine and Rue Beaudry
3. CN Wellington Control Building – Near Rue Smith and Rue Murray
4. Omnipac – 6240 Avenue du Parc
5. Blue Bonnets Raceway – 7440 Boulevard Decarie
6. Jenkins Brothers Steel Co. – Between Avenue Georges V and Ave 1re
7. CN Fruit Warehouse – 500 Rue Bridge
8. Dow Brewery – 990 Rue Notre Dame Ouest
9. The Negro Community Centre/Charles H. Este Cultural Centre – 2035 Rue Coursol
10. Restaurant Chez Clo – 3199 Rue Ontario Est

Source – 10 Abandoned Buildings In Montreal Worth Exploring | MTL Blog.

I took a look at that church/ community centre. Google’s images are from 2012, the post from the MTL Blog was from 2014 so no telling what shape that’s in now, if it’s still there. I noticed something interesting on top of the roof. I thought they were butterflies, but possibly not.

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Urban Combing

Being a little land-locked, it’s not possible to go beach combing in Long Eaton and urban combing is probably the next best thing. Here are lots of bits and pieces I recovered from my garden whilst digging the mud and also a few odds and ends from my walks with the dog.

Source: Urban Combing #1 – I Am A Magpie – a photo on Flickriver

The lost art of found objects. (It sounds great as a phrase but I don’t think beachcombing (or urban combing) has ever been lost).

The Labyrinth of Ordinary Humans

Found a nice quote on another lost urbex site. The direct link is hijacked by the Webring code. I found the site thanks to the Wayback Machine.

“It’s not about busting into businesses and bragging about trespassing. It’s about living a time that is rapidly disappearing, sinking under a new city. The undoctored past is a rare thing to have the privilege to experience, especially because this is not the past of kings or generals or millionaire mansions. This is the past of sewer and drain workers,  factory workers, builders, tunnelers – ordinary people who built the labyrinthine hive of humans, that maze of rooms and halls above ground and under that we know as – a city.”

– Jacques

urbanwanderers
Source: Exploring The Twin Cities’ Underground

Nottawasaga Lighthouse

I had this on my mental list of places to see already. It isn’t that far away. Another place to see and photograph before it’s gone.

Nottawasaga Lighthouse one of National Trust for Canada’s Top 10 Endangered Places.

Erected in 1858, the Nottawasaga Lighthouses was one of six Imperial Towers built to light the shores of Lake Huron and Georgian Bay. The whitewashed limestone light rises 95 feet above the shore, guiding ships to safety in Collingwood Harbour. It played an important part in the establishment of safe navigation routes along the coastal waters of Lake Huron following the opening of the Bruce Peninsula.

Deemed unsafe, the lighthouse was decommissioned in 2003 after an engineering study noted that the lighthouse’s exterior masonry, which had been damaged by lightning strikes and subsequent water infiltration, was at risk of collapse. A year later, a portion of the masonry crumbled. Though the Department of Fisheries and Oceans invested $400,000 to stabilize the remaining façade starting in 2005, it has since been abandoned and, without swift action, is unlikely to survive many more winters.

Source: Nottawasaga Lighthouse | The National Trust for Canada