I had this on my mental list of places to see already. It isn't that far away. Another place to see and photograph before it's gone.
Nottawasaga Lighthouse one of National Trust for Canada's Top 10 Endangered Places. Erected in 1858, the Nottawasaga Lighthouses was one of six Imperial Towers built to light the shores of Lake Huron and Georgian Bay. The whitewashed limestone light rises 95 feet above the shore, guiding ships to safety in Collingwood Harbour. It played an important part in the establishment of safe navigation routes along the coastal waters of Lake Huron following the opening of the Bruce Peninsula. Deemed unsafe, the lighthouse was decommissioned in 2003 after an engineering study noted that the lighthouse’s exterior masonry, which had been damaged by lightning strikes and subsequent water infiltration, was at risk of collapse. A year later, a portion of the masonry crumbled. Though the Department of Fisheries and Oceans invested $400,000 to stabilize the remaining façade starting in 2005, it has since been abandoned and, without swift action, is unlikely to survive many more winters.
Source: Nottawasaga Lighthouse | The National Trust for Canada
Not often I like (or see the point) having models in urban exploration photography. This time it works. I like the piano too. Reposting from Flickr. (Yahoo was blocking the link to the photo. But it was available to download. So, something odd about the direct link). Capture  
littlehouseI’ve seen at least a couple of small houses which have never been lived in. They were built to disguise equipment/ machinery for the telephone/ power company. It’s not so hard to recognize them because they all look about the same. The image in this post comes from Google street view. This house is one I see every time I go to the local grocery store, it's just a couple of streets away, in my neighbourhood. Faux facades, fake buildings or whatever official name they have been given are interesting to find. Have you seen any? You may not have noticed them. You may think your town is too small to have one, or any. It’s not the size of the town, however, it’s the location that counts.
  • power relay stations
  • cell phone infrastructure
  • train tunnels
  • ventilation
  • emergency access
Sources for other fake buildings:

PrintAlthough Michael and Andrea deMeng started the Art Abandonment movement in June of 2012, publicly leaving art for others is not a new concept. Several decades ago there was a movement called “Guerilla Art, ” which inspired the deMengs' art abandonment movement.

History of “Guerrilla” Art

Guerrilla art--or street art--originated in the 1980s.

It consisted of graffiti, street sculpture, murals, wall mosaics, and various other forms of artistic expression. Artists would create the art pieces and leave them in public spaces for others to enjoy.
The reasons for street art varied. Often the artists wanted to make a political statement. Sometimes they wanted to get their work out into the world, and bypass the constraints subjected to them by the rules of the formal art world. At other times, they wanted “ordinary” people to have access to art that they normally would never have the chance to encounter. Finally, sometimes they did it just for the fun of it!

Want to Participate in the Art Abandonment Movement?

If you are interested in becoming part of this movement, you will find that there are just a few rules to follow.  To join in, Michael deMeng makes these simple suggestions. All you have to do is the following:

  1. Make a small piece of art.
  2. Put a tag on it stating that you are leaving the art as a free gift to whoever finds it. Make sure to include your desired contact information.
  3. Discreetly leave the art in a public space.
  4. Take a picture of the space you are leaving it in.
  5. Hope that the person who finds the gift responds either by email or replies on the Art Abandonment Facebook page.
maple farms motelsignI'm meeting my Uncle for lunch tomorrow. I looked up the restaurant on Google Maps to see how to drive there. I checked the street view and found this abandoned motel almost across the street. It may already be demolished. Google's images were not very recent. The motel was boarded up and behind a construction fence. The area is loaded with new strip/ box stores so quite likely the motel won't last long if it is still there at all. See No Pattern Required - Friendship Inn Maple Farms Motel – Road Trip To The Past for images of the motel taken from a brochure in the 1970's. Update - August, 2016 The hotel was gone. No sign it had ever been there at all. maple farms motel maple farms motel1 tumblr_m3yy99pFbN1r2l2w2o1_1280 Source for the last photograph: Michael Helmer Photography
If you are Canadian (not too young) you will remember Hinterland Who's Who on TV. I think this is a great idea for anyone wanting to make their own programs/ videos.
  • Pick a topic (animals if you want to submit it to Hinterland).
  • Do some research.
  • Make your film/ video.
Now you've got your own documentary on video. The same idea can work for urban, rural or any exploring you do. No need to start with something exotic, look into the history of your own home, an interesting place on your own street, or the local park. Start documenting!

Make Your Own HWW Spot

Materials

  • camcorder or digital camera with video and sound recording (optional)
  • video editing software, such as:
    • MAC: iMovie, Final Cut Pro
    • PC: Windows Movie Maker, Adobe Premiere Elements, Adobe Premiere Pro
  • voice recorder

Background

Most Canadians who had television in the 1960s or 1970s will remember it — the haunting strains of a lone flute, the trademark theme of Hinterland Who’s Who. The series of 60-second vignettes was created to educate the public about this country’s native wildlife through excellent film footage, natural sounds, and relaxed narration. Now, more than 40 years after the series’ introduction, Environment Canada (EC) and the Canadian Wildlife Federation (CWF) have relaunched Hinterland Who’s Who in an effort to connect another generation of Canadians with their natural heritage. The new public-service announcements carry on the classic theme of the original vignettes but also address the need to conserve and protect native species and their habitat.

Procedure

Here are some simple steps to make your Hinterland Who’s Who production a success:
  1. Decide on a Canadian wildlife species on which to make a video.
  2. Research basic elements about that species, including information such as:
    • appearance
    • where it lives in Canada
    • how to conserve the species
    Information on many Canadian species can be found at hww.ca
  3. If possible, take your own footage of your chosen species using a camcorder or digital recording device, or find available footage online.
  4. If possible take pictures of your chosen species, or find available photos online. Make sure you get permission from the photographer first!
  5. Combining all the above information, write a short (60 second) video script that ties the species information and imagery together.
  6. Record all audio and combine all elements together, including HWW music and logo, in video editing software.
  7. Submit your video to hww.ca, and where appropriate, videos will be posted online.
Source: Hinterland Who's Who - Make Your Own HWW Spot
It may not be an official name, but street furniture is a good name for all the items and objects which make up a city street. Do you notice the:
  • street signs
  • street lights
  • traffic barriers
  • traffic lights
  • mail boxes
  • hand rails
  • bus stops
  • phone booths
  • cigarette receptacles
  • fire hydrants
  • garbage cans
  • benches
  • bicycle racks
  • parking meters
  • sidewalks
and so many other small, old and taken for granted parts of the city streets? What can you find in your own area which has been around awhile and gone unnoticed?
The first telephone boxes, a porter’s rest from 1861 or a street lamp powered by sewage - just a few of the things we can walk past every day in London without often noticing them. Have you ever noticed the smallest Listed structures in London, the K2 phone boxes?
secret-london.co.uksecret-london.co.uksecret-london.co.uk Source: SECRET LONDON / Trivia / Street_Furniture