abandonedplaces via - Quora. How would you answer the question, for yourself or for others? It’s not so easy to pinpoint why I like abandoned places. I think this is the best I have done at trying to come up with a concrete answer that makes sense and isn’t too much on the flowery side.
Something between proving we have a history, the endurance of what we have created and the mystery and sadness of what has been left behind.
(Reposted from the screen capture because sometimes software mangles image files).
mountiecostumeWhen a uniform becomes customized for various cultures it stops being a uniform. A uniform is… uniform. When it isn’t uniform, all the same, then it becomes similar, not uniform. If the Mounties, police, fire fighters, etc. want to adapt their uniform doesn’t it become a costume? I think allowing various cultures (I am purposely not being specific because the specific culture is not the issue) to have different uniforms makes the uniform mean less. The original point of a uniform was identification, everyone looking the same, being recognizable and having respect. You see the Mounties and know who they are by the uniform. If you see someone wearing a Mountie costume, you think they are on the way to a party and you don’t consider them someone you need to pay much attention to. Badges don’t mean much from a distance, behind a door or to anyone who couldn’t tell a real badge from a fake one. People in authority like Mounties, military and government employees need to be recognizable in order to have that authority and be trusted. Since we were children we have seen Mounties in their dress uniforms and we expect a Mountie to be in that uniform. But, more than the public, what about the Mounties themselves? Why change the uniform which has severed generations of Mounties of all cultures up until now? I’m assuming all Mounties have two arms, two legs, one head so they should all be able to wear the standard uniform. What is the real need for change in this very old tradition worn with pride by generations of people. I don’t know. But, I do think they should stop calling them uniforms, because they aren’t uniforms any more. That tradition has been lost. mountie
Here's something you probably haven't thought to look for, calligraphy or hand made lettering. Not just for the written page but chiseled into stone or carved into wood or painted onto walls. Where else? Visit the blog and see what you may have been missing. (It's typography when it's machine made lettering, calligraphy when it's created by hand). calligraphySource: Calligraphy as Seen From my Bicycle -  Calligraphy in old churches and other places as seen during cycling tours around Europe. By Wlodek Fenrych. 
sos
Save Ontario Shipwrecks is a Provincial Heritage Organization in Ontario dedicated to the study, preservation and promotion of an appreciation of Ontario's marine heritage. Incorporated in 1981, SOS is a public charitable organization of dedicated volunteers from across the Province. Operating mainly through a group of Local Chapter Committees supported by a Provincial Board of Directors and Provincial Executive, our volunteers have undertaken many worthwhile projects and activities.
Source: About | Save Ontario Shipwrecks
Not in Ontario, but, if you take a trip into Quebec it will be nice to have a list of places to see. There must be a great list of places in Quebec City too. Of course, there is the possibility that some of them will be gone before you get there. I found the Restaurant Chez Clo (#10 on the list) is already gone when I looked at the Google Street View link. You can still see it from overhead on Google Earth. But it magically disappears when you go in for a close up to Street View. demolished
With all of the new construction going up around Montreal, it’s easy to forget about the city’s rich history. But Montreal has a long legacy of fascinating buildings that have been abandoned for various reasons. Here are ten of the coolest ones to check out. 1. Silo No. 5 - Pointe-du-Moulin 2. Brock Street Tunnel - Rue St-Antoine and Rue Beaudry 3. CN Wellington Control Building - Near Rue Smith and Rue Murray 4. Omnipac - 6240 Avenue du Parc 5. Blue Bonnets Raceway - 7440 Boulevard Decarie 6. Jenkins Brothers Steel Co. - Between Avenue Georges V and Ave 1re 7. CN Fruit Warehouse - 500 Rue Bridge 8. Dow Brewery - 990 Rue Notre Dame Ouest 9. The Negro Community Centre/Charles H. Este Cultural Centre - 2035 Rue Coursol 10. Restaurant Chez Clo - 3199 Rue Ontario Est
Source - 10 Abandoned Buildings In Montreal Worth Exploring | MTL Blog. I took a look at that church/ community centre. Google's images are from 2012, the post from the MTL Blog was from 2014 so no telling what shape that's in now, if it's still there. I noticed something interesting on top of the roof. I thought they were butterflies, but possibly not. montrealchurchb montrealchurchf montrealchurchs montrealchurchw
Being a little land-locked, it's not possible to go beach combing in Long Eaton and urban combing is probably the next best thing. Here are lots of bits and pieces I recovered from my garden whilst digging the mud and also a few odds and ends from my walks with the dog.
Source: Urban Combing #1 - I Am A Magpie - a photo on Flickriver The lost art of found objects. (It sounds great as a phrase but I don't think beachcombing (or urban combing) has ever been lost).
Found a nice quote on another lost urbex site. The direct link is hijacked by the Webring code. I found the site thanks to the Wayback Machine.
"It’s not about busting into businesses and bragging about trespassing. It’s about living a time that is rapidly disappearing, sinking under a new city. The undoctored past is a rare thing to have the privilege to experience, especially because this is not the past of kings or generals or millionaire mansions. This is the past of sewer and drain workers,  factory workers, builders, tunnelers – ordinary people who built the labyrinthine hive of humans, that maze of rooms and halls above ground and under that we know as – a city."
- Jacques urbanwanderers Source: Exploring The Twin Cities' Underground