I'd like to read the books by Nick Eyles, about Canadian geology. Two of his books are about Ontario history and places to see for the rocks. Road Rocks Ontario and Ontario Rocks. I have always liked rocks, one of the oldest and most enduring things on our planet. Really, is there anything that can top a rock for endurance and long life? I studied physical geography in high school. A lot more than rocks and geology involved in geography but everything involves or stands on rocks at some point. As an explorer of old places I especially like seeing the wear and tear caused by weathering. Bricks, stone, glass, wood are all changed by the wind and rain. One of the things being swept up by wind and water are rocks (sand, pebbles, etc.). Weathering of rocks forms the very ground we rely on. How can anyone not have a fascination with rocks and their history?
I have especially liked Manitoba since I first traveled out west from Ontario. I considered moving to Winnipeg, sometimes I still consider moving there. Winnipeg felt like a ruralized version of Toronto. I liked the local transit, the people I met and, more importantly, Winnipeg has great history and old buildings. I'm looking forward to the arrival of the book! Update: the book arrived soon after I ordered it. It is wonderful. Highly recommended to history lovers and explorers in Manitoba (or anyone traveling in the province).  Abandoned Manitoba by Gordon Goldsborough.
I'd like to see that lighthouse. Of course, being England and a town on the coast, there are lots of old places and things (like shipwrecks) to see. The lighthouse would be special. Finding images of it from long ago would be great to compare with how it is now. I like finding lighthouses here, in Ontario. Unless something leftover from the Vikings is discovered, there won't be any as old as this Roman lighthouse, in Canada. These images are from The Shepherds of Dover, on Facebook by way of the Bored Panda website. Source: We Moved To Live In The Worst Place In England, And Here’s What It’s Like | Bored Panda
Dale Jarvis has a site, #NLunexplained. He writes about Newfoundland and Labrador. Haunted Shores Haunted Ground Haunted Waters Wonderful Strange The Golden Leg (for children)
I found this map for sale in an Etsy shop, civicatlas. With shipping, it would cost over $50 to have a print copy. Sure, it would be a nice size but more than I can spend. If you have the resources I recommend getting it for any Toronto history explorers. As you can see, there are excellent images of old architecture, likely gone or very different looking now. To see more of it myself, I searched online and found it Historical Maps of Toronto, with a link to the source for the full map at the University of Toronto. Here are screenshots, to give you a preview. I would like to have this covering an entire wall of my house. But, I will settle for keeping it as wallpaper for my desktop computer. Meanwhile, I did download the full file and I can see what it would cost to get it printed. Possibly a local business where the photographer reprints and fixes old photographs, might be just the place.
Windsor Blight, on Flickr
Group Description This group is for all those photos of Windsor, Ontario that exhibit the current state of property in the city. Abandoned homes, brownfields, vacant stores, empty factories, etc. The current commercial vacancy rate in downtown Windsor is an astonishing 24%. The residential vacancy rate is the highest in the country, and has been rising since 2005. Businesses are closing left and right, and our leaders don't seem to understand the importance of a vibrant downtown. A lot can be said about this subject, but this group's purpose is to SHOW our leaders what is happening across our city. Add your photos of blight in Windsor, and hopefully we can illustrate to the powers that be that immediate action is needed.
The Beaver is now archived online, from 1920 to the present. I found this in October 1920. Very likely the art has outlived the artist. Would this even be published in a magazine now? Hunting a polar bear as they go extinct.