Somewhere in Scotland. What an interesting little place. Likely the tales of ghosts and witches were based on suspicion/ fear and just trying to keep people from getting hurt in there. Now it's locked. What a sad, and yet sensible, ending. There must have been (or still are) other places like this. Is it even a well? Seems an odd structure to use for water, wouldn't it get stagnant without some sunlight and air flow?
Below is the Red Well, said to date from Roman times, also said to be haunted by an old lady ghost and to be aligned for sunrise sunbeams on the summer solstice. I lived in Whitehills for a short time as a child and remember the beehive shaped building being called ‘the witch’s hoosie’ and kids shutting each other in there for ‘fun’. It’s now locked.
Source: going coastal - Ailish Sinclair
mountiecostumeWhen a uniform becomes customized for various cultures it stops being a uniform. A uniform is… uniform. When it isn’t uniform, all the same, then it becomes similar, not uniform. If the Mounties, police, fire fighters, etc. want to adapt their uniform doesn’t it become a costume? I think allowing various cultures (I am purposely not being specific because the specific culture is not the issue) to have different uniforms makes the uniform mean less. The original point of a uniform was identification, everyone looking the same, being recognizable and having respect. You see the Mounties and know who they are by the uniform. If you see someone wearing a Mountie costume, you think they are on the way to a party and you don’t consider them someone you need to pay much attention to. Badges don’t mean much from a distance, behind a door or to anyone who couldn’t tell a real badge from a fake one. People in authority like Mounties, military and government employees need to be recognizable in order to have that authority and be trusted. Since we were children we have seen Mounties in their dress uniforms and we expect a Mountie to be in that uniform. But, more than the public, what about the Mounties themselves? Why change the uniform which has severed generations of Mounties of all cultures up until now? I’m assuming all Mounties have two arms, two legs, one head so they should all be able to wear the standard uniform. What is the real need for change in this very old tradition worn with pride by generations of people. I don’t know. But, I do think they should stop calling them uniforms, because they aren’t uniforms any more. That tradition has been lost. mountie
Ontario Road Map  - Road map collector. Site by Neal. The King's Highway - The history of Ontario's King's highways. Site by Cameron Bevers. Ontario Highways - Site by Christopher J. Bessert, Cartographer, GIS Specialist, Highway Historian. The Ontario Highwayman - Site by Chris Beach. The King's Highway Ends Site - Old site by Earl Andrew Washburn. Ontario Road and Highways - Yahoo group (active). Asphalt Planet Ontario, Quebec and US road history and photographs. Site by Scott Steeves. Historic Roads - Dedicated to the identification, preservation and management of historic roads. Site by Paul Daniel Marriott & Associates. Washington, DC. Historic Bridges - North American bridges.  (Ontario link). Site by Nathan Holth. misc.transport.roads - Google Groups.

Have you found a lost road and photographed it?

They aren't that tough to come across. Read local history to find where routes were changed. Not every road grew into a bigger road, some were bypassed and forgotten. Those are the old roads to look for, or to start with. As you find old roads you will soon find other old and forgotten roads. Bridges too. What about dead ends, do they count as a lost road or not? Meanwhile, the links above will get you started with your own research and exploring. oldontarioroad

Information for Highway Explorers

I found some US highway history.  Likely the information will be similar for Ontario and Canadian highways and roads but... that will be another post. So far I found a lot of Canadian (and Ontario specific) resources but I haven't done the research yet.
Prior to the Federal Interstate Highway system, the United States was criss-crossed by roads built by for profit groups. During the 1920s many of these roads could barely be called roads as they were more mud, dirt and ditches than road. But, as Henry Ford continued to churn out automobiles, more and more of these state highways popped up across the landscape. Most of these roads followed old trails or Transcontinental Trails like the Oregon and Santa Fe. One of the first transcontinental highways was the Lincoln Highway from New York to San Francisco. It was a rock road and privately financed; Henry Ford wanted nothing to do with it because he thought roads and highways should be funded by the government. As the 1920s progress other groups formed to build and promote their own highways. By 1925, there were over 250 named highways, each with their own colored signs, names, and random sign placement. Without government oversight, many of these roads were re-routed into cities so that the clubs and groups that built them could profit from them. In the midst of this chaos, the Federal government got involved in 1924 and started numbering all of these roads. Odd numbers ran North to South with the numbers increasing from East to West, and Even numbers run East to West with the numbers increasing from North to South. So, U.S. Route 1 runs along the Eastern Seaboard while U.S. Route 10 runs along the Canadian border. When the Interstate Highways came along, the government decided to use the mirror image of the numbering system to avoid any confusion. Interstate 10 runs through the southern states while I-5 is in California. Thankfully, the government was wise enough to help avoid the classic “How could you get us lost?” fight between drivers and map readers. Where the two systems, the routes and the Interstates, meet in the middle of the country it was decided that there would be no Interstate 50 to avoid confusion with U.S. Route 50 which runs from Sacramento, CA to Ocean City, MD. This is the same for Interstate 60.
via -  9 Things You May Not Know About the U.S. Interstate Highways | From The Kitchen Cabinet
When the Interstate Highway Act was passed, most Americans thought it was a good idea. But when construction started and people, especially in urban areas, were displaced and communities cut in half, some started to revolt. In the 1960s, activists stopped construction on highways in New York, Baltimore, Washington, D.C., and New Orleans, which resulted in several urban interstates becoming roads to nowhere. The red, white, and blue shields used to designate interstate numbers are trademarked by the American Association of State Highway Officials. The original design for the shield was drawn by senior traffic engineer Richard Oliver of Texas and selected out of 100 entries in a national design competition in 1957. A major concern during Eisenhower’s presidency was what the country would do in the event of a nuclear attack. One of the justifications for the building of the interstate system was its ability to evacuate citizens of major cities if necessary.
via - 10 Things You Might Not Know About the U.S. Interstate System | Mental Floss
How would you design a traffic/ road sign? All the elements of sign design you never thought of, come into play when you really start planning a better road sign. The idea isn't new. I've saved screen captures from the Wayback Machine from the older site (below). Glad to see someone else has taken up the idea and kept it going on another site. I'm linking there first so people can see what's new and contribute ideas of their own.
I used to send possible highway route signs to the owner of The Great International Highway makeover website, Mr. R. V. Droz, a while back. Well I found out recently that his email link at his website is inoperable. Rats. I hope it'll work well in the future.
Source: International Highway Makeover 2 From the old site, by Robert V. Droz.
Highway route markers have gotten boring over time. In the 1940's, there were many varied shapes and colors. Many governments opted for the MUTCD default (circles) or plain blank squares. The justification for those sparse designs is that they provide for increased number visibility and easy recognition. True enough, but nothing says you can't design a useful sign that's graphically attractive. Linked below are many examples of potential re-designs.
highwaymakeover1 highwaymakeover2 highwaymakeover3 highwaymakeovercan highwaymakeoverab highwaymakeovernorth highwaymakeoveront highwaymakeoverpq highwaymakeoversk highwaysignmakeover
How would you design a traffic/ road sign? All the elements of sign design you never thought of, come into play when you really start planning a better road sign. The idea isn't new. I've saved screen captures from the Wayback Machine from the older site (below). Glad to see someone else has taken up the idea and kept it going on another site. I'm linking there first so people can see what's new and contribute ideas of their own.
I used to send possible highway route signs to the owner of The Great International Highway makeover website, Mr. R. V. Droz, a while back. Well I found out recently that his email link at his website is inoperable. Rats. I hope it'll work well in the future.
Source: International Highway Makeover 2 From the old site, by Robert V. Droz.
Highway route markers have gotten boring over time. In the 1940's, there were many varied shapes and colors. Many governments opted for the MUTCD default (circles) or plain blank squares. The justification for those sparse designs is that they provide for increased number visibility and easy recognition. True enough, but nothing says you can't design a useful sign that's graphically attractive. Linked below are many examples of potential re-designs.
highwaymakeover1 highwaymakeover2 highwaymakeover3 highwaymakeovercan highwaymakeoverab highwaymakeovernorth highwaymakeoveront highwaymakeoverpq highwaymakeoversk highwaysignmakeover
The following is my comment on the post about Barrie, on the site about places along Highway 11 in Ontario.
I think your review of Barrie was good. I’ve been here about 10 years now. I grew up in Port Union, Ontario, before it became Scarborough, and after. Barrie is pretty suburban still. Downtown Barrie still has a lot of bars and drinking night life. The box malls and shopping in general didn’t get into downtown Barrie, just the outskirts. It helps keep traffic from being completely locked up during weekends when there are people out shopping and even more people navigating the cottage highway. There is a new mall going up not far from where I am. It will be right at the highway turn off for Duckworth, where the hospital and Georgian College are. The two lane bridge which ran under the highway is being done over. A big project but it has been needed for a long time. Living in Barrie I especially like being on the lake and actually seeing it. I grew up on Lake Ontario and I have missed having a big lake nearby – it was one of the reasons I picked Barrie. Last note, for anyone traveling to Barrie in the winter, it does get colder here as we are at least a couple of snow belts up from the weather in the GTA.
Source: Barrie | Ontario Highway 11 Blog Nice idea for a blog/ site. If you are along the highway have a look at your town.
Old postcards of Toronto when it was still known as York. toronto1834 toronto18342