Ghost Preservation Worse Than Demolition?

This is not preserving history. It looks like a skin graft that didn’t take. A mask to be taken off when the party is over. I haven’t noticed anything like this before, but, I’m not living in Toronto these days.

Worse than demolition? I don’t know. I doubt something left like this will be maintained with the same effort as the newer building which really is part of the structure. How likely is the old facade to be left to crumble away when it really isn’t needed. Just an attempt at making peace with local historians.

This is why I love the photographs of the original places. It is sad that photographic technology hasn’t always had all the options for colour and detail which we have now. Yet, what will people a hundred years from now think of our obsolete images? Nothing can really be preserved, it can only be kept a little longer.

London is filled with grafted facades, nearly two-dimensional artifacts held in place while updated buildings are constructed behind them; many seem to haphazardly half-disguise the boring new stru…

Source: Saving Face: ‘Ghost Facade’ Preservation Worse Than Demolition? | Urbanist

Underwater Ruins, Japan

One of the most hotly debated underwater discoveries dates back to 1995 and is still producing differing theories today. A wayward diver stumbled across the ancient ruin site off the southern coast of Yonaguni, Japan. The site appeared to show huge stone blocks cut into the shape of stairs, paved streets and crossroads. The discovery is estimated to be around 10,000 years old, with many scientists believing it to be the remains of an ancient sunken city. Not everyone agrees though and some experts believe the large blocks are naturally formed and the result of tectonic movement. Whatever the answer may be, it is undoubtedly one of the greatest underwater wonders of the world.

Source: 3. Underwater Ruins. Japan | 20 Underwater Wonders of Our Blue Planet | EarthTripper| Page 1

Lion City at the Bottom of a Lake in China


A real life version of Atlantis can be found at the bottom of a man-made lake in China. In 1959, the Chinese Government decided that they wanted to build a new hydro-electric power station and so made the call to build a huge lake in the Eastern Provence of Zhejiang. The lake was built between the Five Lion Mountain and the ancient city of Shi Cheng (Lion City), that was flooded in order to make way for the power station. The city has been untouched for over 50 years. A dive team has recently rediscovered the remains of the city but there are now plans to turn it into a dive site. Incredibly, the dive team said that nearly every structure in Lion City was still intact, even after lying underwater for over half a century!

Lion City, China

Source: 20 Underwater Wonders of Our Blue Planet | EarthTripper

The original source link for this photo is 404.  Loved the photo too much to not repost it.